Every time someone asks me, “What’s that?” there’s about a 70 percent chance I know exactly what they’re referring to. It’s my PopSocket, the bizarre circular device sticking out of the back of my phone that, also 70 percent of the time, I am busy fidgeting with. There is such a thing as “journalistic ethics” wherein I should probably not reveal my extreme personal bias about PopSockets in the process of writing an article about them, but reader, I must do so anyway. I love PopSockets. I pity my former self who existed for more than a decade with a cellphone without a PopSocket. My life is separated into two eras: pre-PopSocket and post-PopSocket, and the latter is far, far superior. I am also not alone in this: Start a conversation with any PopSocket haver, which I have done many times over, and they will almost always seem far too enthusiastic about a piece of plastic that costs less than $10 than they should. That is, until you experience the joy of a PopSocket yourself and become one of them. The story of PopSockets is this: In 2010, David Barnett was a philosophy professor at the University of Colorado Boulder who was sick of his iPhone headphone cord getting tangled up in ...